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Cattleya unknown hybrid

Cattleya unknown hybrid

Original submission as Cattleya labiata, name change as per comments below.

Another of John's images. He is also a keen photographer.
bernabu

Cattleya unknown hybrid

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Cattleya labiata

Bernard,
I am raising hundreds C. labiata. Every year are blooming 300 - 400 of them in my green house.
I am also going to at least 3 expositions of C. labiatas every year and I never did see a C.labiata like this.
Or this must be a very rare variety or we are locking at a hybrid.
Horst

labiata

Horst, many thanks for your comments, personally, I can't tell you whether this is a species or a hybrid. I do value Johns expertise and he is normally very meticulous when ascribing a name to one of his plants.
bernabu

bernabu

labiata

Bern, John's photos are great but I have to agree with Horst that this is a hybrid.

Bill

labiata

OK, will speak to John for his reaction, he may be able to furnish me with further details.
bernard

bernabu

labiata

John left the label that was with this plant when he obtained it, he also has had doubts about the name and would be happy if someone could name it.
bernabu

bernabu

Catt. unknown

Sorry Bern, there is not much chance of naming this plant, I'll edit to Catt. unknown.

Bill

Thanks Bill

That's the only way to proceed.
Bernard

bernabu

Cattleya unknown hybrid

Horst/Bill, The item I posted (re reply from John) on the 6th Dec was incorrect, due to a misunderstanding on my part. John has since looked up his records and has furnished me with the following. Which may be of some help.
1. Flask originally purchased as being Catasetum??? in 1993 from Equilab in Brazil, founder Ademar Manarini. You may have heard of him Horst?
2. As the contents of this flask turned into seedlings of a reasonable size it became very clear that they were not of Catasetum but rather some kind of Laeliinae.
3. Flowering occured 4 years after deflasking, in 1997, and seemed to be of a rather attractive kind of Cattleya with a beautiful scent and similar to the image posted on the OOL website, but smaller.
4. In the following years, many plants flowered-some with flowers identical to the first but others looking like a normal Cattleya labiata. There were also a few clones with stunted, deformed flowers (a clue here?)
5. I passed on many plants to other enthusiasts although with some reluctance as the flowers were so atractive!
6. In trying to provide an accurate name for these clones I first asked Equilab for help but this was not conclusive. Then I scoured the internet but also to no avail. Friendly experts in the UK were also approached-some thought it was Cattleya labiata and others said it was something else,probably a Cattleya hybrid but could they please have one of them and here is £30 thank you.
7. I only started to get some clues when I consulted the excellent monograph
'Cattleya labiata Linley' (L.C.Menezes-Editora Expressao e Cultura;
ISBN:85-208-0095-5). From the many images contained in this volume I came to the conclusion that an appropriate identification might be Cattleya labiata var labiata and there the matter rested whilst I enjoyed the stunning beauty of the flowers.
8. Doubts started to creep in when I found out that Equilab in the 1990's had experienced a few problems with a dissaffected employee and had lost the custom of Stewart's Orchids in the States. It appeared that they had been flasking for Stewart's
(whether Equilab's or Stewart's pods I do not know) and Stewart's complained that they had discovered many instances of the contents of flasks not being what was written on the label.
John via bernabu

bernabu

Great history

I really enjoyed reading that history Bernard, just shows everyone what can happen out there and we have no control over what we purchase in good faith.

Bill